How to Set Up a Brooder for Chicks

Brooder for chicksOnce you’ve determined that backyard chickens are right for you, the next step is to set up a brooder for baby chicks.  A brooder is a little box or tub with just the right temperature for your baby chicks.  It’s doesn’t have to be fancy at all.  Your chicks won’t notice if it’s an old box or a metal tub that usually holds sports equipment like ours.  It does need to have a cover for it.  We don’t want any chicks escaping!  Ours had a screen sitting directly on the top of the brooder until the chicks got to be too tall and we had to go with tall sides instead.  When the chicks start to brush their heads against the top, you know it’s time to raise the ceiling a bit!

Setting up a brooder

Our brooder is set up in our basement and I’m not happy about this location.  The brooder is next to my laundry area where all of our clean clothes hang to dry.  Chicks create a lot of dust – their downy feathers are flying and it’s super dusty.  Dust with damp clothes?  The clothes are a magnet for the dust storm I’m sure of it!  That’s my warning.  Our garage is too cold otherwise these chicks would be out there.

Setting up a brooder (5)

How to set up a brooder for chicks

Components needed:

  • Tub or large cardboard box
  • Red heat lamp bulb (250W) and light – make sure you get one with a metal guard on it so that bulb can’t come into contact with anything.
  • Adjustable chain for light – we bought our chain used at the ReBuilding Center and they have lots of used items for assembling brooders and building coops.
  • Water dispenser – you’ll want to figure out how to keep this from being knocked over.  I used a piece of stretchy fabric and tied this onto the tub.
  • Food bowl for chick feed – they’re growing babies and they eat – lots!
  • Bedding – pine shavings and newspaper.  These can be composted and you don’t need too much of either.  Do not use cedar shavings which are poisonous for chickens.
  • Screen – to go around tub or box and perhaps over the top.  You won’t believe how quickly baby chicks will begin planning their chicken run!
  • Roosting bar – stick or wood dowel for chicks to sit on.  They love to roost.

Setting up a brooder

Nice to have but not necessary is a thermometer – we have never used one of these but I mention it because you do need to keep chicks warm.  You can tell if they’re warm or not by their behavior.  Too cold – they’re huddled together directly beneath the light.  Too hot – they’re as far away from the light as possible.

Baby Chicks

Related Links:
Are backyard chickens right for you?
Good and bad of backyard chickens – pros and cons
Fall in love with backyard chickens
A home exchange turned into us getting chickens – find out how here
How to hold baby chicks is here

Sara

Sara, creator of Go Gingham, is passionate about cooking and feeding her family healthy, real food. She's a green enthusiast, too, who loves to grow food organically. Sara loves to travel - especially by trading houses. An avid runner, she can also be found chasing after her chickens in the backyard.

2 Comments


  1. I love your tall walls – I am going to do that next time! Our chicks were in my office with me – which is a small room off of our dining room – it sort of smelled and was dusty as well! At least they were nearby and we could check on them all the time. The kids love having chicks!


    1. Annie, it is nice to have the chicks close by to check on them – especially as they turn into teenagers and start to get into trouble – hence the tall walls and the water somewhat strapped to the side. We’ve loved having them, too, and are beginning to talk about moving them outside with the big chickens!

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