How to Roast Tomatoes

 

Fresh tomatoesThere have been so many tomatoes turning red on my tomato vines the past couple of weeks, I’ve been roasting tomatoes like crazy. If you’ve always wanted to know how to roast tomatoes, it’s super easy and there’s no blanching, scooping out of seeds or food waste. Once you’ve roasted tomatoes, you can make your own marinara sauce, pizza sauce, or tomato soup. Freshly roasted tomatoes taste so much better than those from a can you’ll be wishing you could grow tomatoes all year-round.

If you’re getting to the end of tomato picking, harvest all of your ripe tomatoes. Or your not so ripe tomatoes. At the end of last tomato season, I roasted all of our  remaining tomatoes, before they froze on the vine. Toss a few green tomatoes onto your roasting pan with your red ones and no one will notice.

Roasting tomatoes

How to Roast Tomatoes

Tomatoes in the garden

Ingredients

  • tomatoes – lots or little – either is fine
  • canola oil (or other oil you like to cook with)
  • salt and pepper (and red pepper flakes if you’d like to spice it up)
  • basil, thyme, green peppers – optional

Directions

Pull the green stems off and slice your tomatoes in half. No need to remove the seeds and don’t even think about blanching them.

Remove green stems to roast
Just slice tomatoes in half before roasting them. Leave the skins and seeds and save yourself time and effort.

Place the tomatoes on a baking sheet or jelly roll pan that’s been sprayed with a baking spray or just brush it with canola oil.

For cherry tomatoes, don’t do anything. Just put them on the sheet to fill in your empty spaces from your slicing tomatoes.

Roast tomatoes from garden

Drizzle (don’t drown) the tomatoes with canola oil and brush it around. The oil is really to keep the spices on the tomatoes. Then sprinkle the tomatoes with salt, pepper, or other spices you might like. I like to add red pepper flakes to give the tomatoes a little kick.

Tossed in for fun were a few basil leaves from the garden. You can also add green peppers or thyme, if you have those growing in your garden.

How to roast tomatoes at home

I had lots of tomatoes to roast!

Tomatoes ready to roast

Place the jelly roll pans filled with tomatoes in a pre-heated 400 degree oven. Bake for 30 minutes.

Once the tomatoes have baked for 30 minutes, set the oven to broil and roast your tomatoes for 5 minutes.

After you’ve removed the tomatoes from the oven and let them cool, run them through your food processor or blender, skins, liquid and all.

Either a blender or a food processor works well. If I’m in a hurry and impatient about letting my tomatoes cool, I use my blender because it’s glass and not my food processor, which is plastic.

Roasted tomatoes

After the roasted tomatoes have cooled, I pour them into freezer containers making sure to leave “head space” at the top of the container. Food expands as it freezes so make sure you leave room for it to do so. It can be very messy when there’s not enough room. Trust me on that. (Just today I found a glass jar of chicken broth that had cracked and leaked chicken broth into my freezer. I was sad about having to clean up but more sad about having to toss out my broken jar filled with homemade broth!)

Here’s an example of what happens as the sauce freezes.  Frozen food expands

This is the end of last season’s tomatoes. I roasted everything, regardless of size, shape or color.

How to Roast Tomatoes

Roasted tomatoes in jars before they went into the freezer.

Roasted tomatoes in jars

This is a great way to use every last tomato in your garden so there’s no food waste, it’s easy to do, and it tastes great. (I give the green tomato tops to our backyard chickens and then there’s really no waste – those girls love tomato tops!) By skipping the time consuming steps in the kitchen of blanching and removing seeds, it makes roasting tomatoes very easy.

A PDF version of this recipe is available here: How to Roast Tomatoes

What do you do with lots of tomatoes? Roast them? Freeze?

Go Gingham related links:

Homemade pesto – that can be made and frozen
How to roast red peppers or food you’re supposed to burn
Roasted garlic spread that’s another great dip or spread
Spicy, homemade hummus that you make from dried beans
How to stake tomato plants – a very stylishly frugal method!
Why my tomato plants are happy – what I plant with them

Sara

Sara, creator of Go Gingham, is passionate about cooking and feeding her family healthy, real food. She's a green enthusiast, too, who loves to grow food organically. Sara loves to travel - especially by trading houses. An avid runner, she can also be found chasing after her chickens in the backyard.

4 Comments


  1. That looks super easy! I don’t have enough tomatoes this year – but maybe next year. I just ate the few yellow cherry tomatoes today – straight off of the vine – so yummy! Maybe I will get some tomatoes from the farmstand and roast them! Thanks for always breaking down the steps and making these projects so much simpler than I expect them to be!
    Annie Kip recently posted..Cheats: Easiest Party Salad EVER


    1. Thanks, Annie! It is really easy and tastes so much better than buying them at the store. I don’t like to waste any food and especially my delicious tomatoes that have taken so long to ripen! You’re welcome for breaking down the steps, too. I just know that when things are easy, I do them. If I look at a long, involved recipe or one with lots of steps, I got overwhelmed and don’t do it. Or, I figure out a way to eliminate steps like this recipe 😉


    1. Heidi, it’s a much healthier alternative to frying up all of the green tomatoes! Someone just suggested pulling the tomato plants out of the ground and hanging them upside down in my garage so that they ripen. I’m going to try it and see if it works. Thanks, Heidi!

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